Here’s the #1 reason to avoid raking leaves this fall

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Here’s the #1 reason to avoid raking leaves this fall
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If your back hurts just thinking about all of the dead leaves you need to rake, we may have a good excuse to get you off the hook — saving you both time and money! 

According to the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), the best thing to do is leave the leaves right on the lawn.

No raking necessary: Why you should ‘leave the leaves’ 

Read more: 5 freakishly creative home and garden hacks

“A leaf layer several inches deep is a natural thing in any area where trees naturally grow. The leaf layer is its own mini ecosystem!” the organization said on its blog.

The NWF argues that by raking leaves you’re eliminating a wildlife habitat that turtles, birds and other types of critters rely on. Leaf litter can be used by them for food, shelter and nesting material.

On top of that, the group says fallen leaves are good for your garden, providing a natural mulch and fertilizing the soil.

If you still feel obligated to rake leaves, the NWF says you should avoid throwing them in the trash. Compost them or drop the leaves off at a community recycling center.

To recap, here are the NWF’s top tips:

  • Leave the leaves: Consider chopping them with a mulching mower to avoid hurting your lawn.
  • Use as mulch: Rake them off the lawn and use them as mulch in garden beds.
  • Make compost: Combine fallen leaves with grass clippings. 

If you don’t think this will work because your homeowners association is too strict, here’s a simple trick to quickly remove dead leaves from your yard without an expensive leaf blower or even a rake. 

Read more: 25 home cleaning hacks that will make your life so much easier

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Michael Timmermann paid off his mortgage in two years. Now, he shares his money-saving tips on his blog, MichaelSaves.com.
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