The 6 best sedans you can buy at deep discount right now

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chevy impala 2018
Image Credit: Chevrolet
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Looking for a new car that offers the most for your money right now? Because of various market conditions, there are six models you may want to check out!

The humble four-door sedan is having a moment right now — and not in a good way. Customer preferences are changing and the sedan is no longer the go-to vehicle for families and other motorists that it once was.

“Sedans are unloved,” money expert Clark Howard says. “It’s almost like they’re dinosaurs in the car market. The auto market has shifted so fast that it’s caught automakers flat-footed [with too many sedans.]”

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Here are the sedans with the deepest discounts today

A new report from the Associated Press finds the following sedans are sitting around on dealer lots for 33% longer than usual, so dealers are motivated to let them go at prices much lower than normal.

2018 Acura TLX

acura tlx 2018

Average MSRP: $40,037

Average savings: $4,214

2018 Chevy Impala

chevy impala 2018

Average MSRP: $35,271

Average savings: $1,980

2018 Dodge Charger

dodge charger 2018

Average MSRP: $40,854

Average savings: $1,449

2018 Toyota Avalon

toyota avalon 2018

Average MSRP: $39,180

Average savings: $3,442

2018 Toyota Avalon (hybrid)

toyota avalon 2018 hybrid

Average MSRP: $42,454

Average savings: $3,991

2018 VW Passat

vw passat 2018

Average MSRP: $27,588

Average savings: $2,392

Why are sedans such a bargain right now?

You may have heard that Ford has decided to exit the passenger car business and only make crossovers, SUVs and trucks for the U.S. market.

Ford’s not the only one. Chrysler makes almost no passenger cars to be sold in the U.S. anymore. And with GM, although they still sell passenger cars, the emphasis is on the light truck market with its various brands.

Meanwhile, certain foreign nameplates that also sell in other markets and still happen to be car-oriented have been caught with a big oversupply at a time when few American buyers want sedans.

So the discounts are getting bigger and bigger as both manufacturers and dealers try to move those cars.

The discounts are coming multiple ways, according to Clark. First, they’re coming on select new cars. Certain Japanese and German nameplates are having to offer manufacturer incentives right around 10% of the value of the vehicle. That is a huge number.

It means that a $30,000 car would come with $3,000 in incentives from the manufacturer, Clark says. That’s before you even get to the dealer. And most dealers receive additional kickbacks from the manufacturer based on how many units they sell. That puts them in a position to need to wheel and deal.

“The invoice price has become fiction because with a passenger car, the dealer could sell you a car way below the invoice price and still make a decent profit on the sale of a sedan,” the consumer champ notes.

“I never recall a circumstance where one part of the market was so strong while other parts are so weak,” Clark says of the disparity between the popular SUV/crossover/truck market and the ailing sedan market.

“There is always money to be saved when you zig when everybody else zags,” he continues. “So if you are happy driving a car and don’t care about what’s hot in the auto market, this is your time right now.”

Do you know the right way to buy a new car?

The days of going to the dealership and haggling are over. Clark has step-by-step instructions for you to follow if you want to buy a new car.

Of course, the money expert routinely recommends that auto shoppers buy a two- or three-year-old used car and keep it for three to four years. That way, you avoid the costs of depreciation and you may be able to pay cash for an affordable used car instead of paying interest on a loan for a new ride.

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Theo Thimou About the author:
Theo has co-written several books with Clark Howard, including the New York Times #1 bestseller Living Large in Lean Times. As a single widowed parent of two young children, he strives to bring unique savings tips to men and women like him who must face life without their spouses. He can be reached at [email protected]
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