7 Easy Ways To Lower Your Heating Bill

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With the weather getting colder, you’ve likely turned on your furnace to keep your home warm. That usually means that your heating bill is going to increase. But it doesn’t have to be so.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to lower your heating bill this winter.

How To Lower Your Heating Bill This Winter

Clark.com wants you to keep as much of your hard-earned money as possible so I have some cash-saving tips from money expert Clark Howard, the latest price information on heat-saving tools and more.

Table of Contents:

Get a Water Heater Blanket

Newer water heaters are typically well insulated, but f your water heater is more than five years old or has an R-value of less than 24, invest in a water heater blanket. Your wallet will thank you.

“Water heater insulation could reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you about 7%–16% in water heating costs — and should pay for itself in about a year,” according to the U.S. Energy Department.

The agency says you can find pre-cut jackets or blankets available from around $20.

I checked prices for a water heater blanket. Here’s what I found:

Get a Smart Thermostat

For the best energy efficiency in heating your home in the winter, get a programmable smart thermostat. One of our favorites is the Google Nest.

Clark is a big fan of the Nest thermostat. “I’ve tried the Nest at my home and am very happy with its performance. I’ve found it reduces your energy bill by the 30% that’s advertised,” he says.

Here are some places where you can buy a Nest:

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Caulk Around Small Leaks

Let’s start our list off with some tips from home improvement guru Dave Baker of TheHomeFixItPage.com, who shares how to lower your heating bill by improving air circulation in your home.

Perform a Blower Test To Find Leaks

Dave says the first thing you need to do before you decide on which insulation projects should be your priorities is to perform a blower door test, which shouldn’t cost you a thing.

“Good heating and air companies and insulation companies will come to your house and do it for free,” he says.

Here’s what a blower door test entails: “They’ll open up your front door and they’ll put this big sheet around it with a fan that blows out of your house. They’ll turn it on, they’ll blow the air out of your house and you will find every leak of air that comes out of your house because it will be sucked through the fan,” Dave says.

Dave says you shouldn’t be surprised if you find leaks around several windows, doors and your attic.

“A lot of times, painters will come in your house and paint, but they won’t caulk all the way around because they can’t reach all the way around,” he says. “You need to get a little step stool or a little ladder and caulk all the way around the inside of your windows.”

That’s an inexpensive way to seal the air out of your windows and doors, and you can save money by doing it yourself.

Lock in a Low Natural Gas Rate

In most states, what you pay for natural gas is not regulated by the state. Instead, it is determined by the market rate, which means you should be able to shop around for the best deal.

Once you find a low rate, you may be able to lock it in for up to 12 months. See if your state’s natural gas market is deregulated.

If you live in a deregulated state, search for your state’s Public Service Commission webpage. There you’ll be able to find monthly energy prices to help you comparison shop for the lowest rate.

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Install Energy-Efficient Window Coverings

Another way to save is to invest in some window coverings. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, “About 30% of a home’s heating energy is lost through windows. In cooling seasons, about 76% of the sunlight that falls on standard double-pane windows enters to become heat.  Window coverings can help with this energy loss and lowering energy bills.”

How much you can save by installing covers to your windows will depend on the type of covering you choose.

Keep Your Thermostat on the Optimal Setting

You can get optimal savings if you keep your thermostat adjustments to a minimum depending on the season.

The DOE recommends 68 degrees as the ideal temperature to save energy in the winter and still be comfortable. The agency also suggests that you consider setting your thermostat lower while you’re asleep or away from the house.

The government agency also says that, no matter what temperature you decide on, you can save about 10% a year (up to hundreds of dollars) on your energy bills by dialing the thermostat back 7-10 degrees from its normal setting for eight hours every day (at night or while you’re at work).

Here are some more tips on thermostat settings.

Add Insulation to Your Attic

If you have air leaks in your attic, you’ll need to add some insulation. You can go the do-it-yourself route or hire a professional.

1. Spray-In Foam

“The most expensive thing you can do is to put spray-in foam insulation in your attic,” Dave says. “You can’t do that yourself.”

Foam will make your whole attic area look like a cave — but you can’t beat it, he says. “That is the single best insulation you can put in your house. It will seal all the cracks and leaks in your attic.”

2. Apply Foam Only Where the Leaks Are

There is a less expensive option when it comes to foam, Dave says: “A good insulation contractor will come in and find where all the leaks are, and they’ll use the spray foam just for the leaks. Then they’ll add more blown-in fiberglass insulation on the floor of your attic. That is very good, too and is the second-best thing you can do to save money because it’s going to be less expensive than the whole foamed attic.”

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“The third thing you can do, and this is not quite as good because you’re not sealing all the leaks, is just to add more blown-in insulation in your attic,” Dave says.

3. DIY Foam Insulation

“Here’s a good rule of thumb: If you stick your head up in the attic and you can see the joists on the floor of the attic, you don’t have enough insulation, you’re not even really close,” Dave says. “Twenty inches [of thickness] is a good number [for] attic insulation.”

In many cases, insulating your attic with foam can cost upward of $5,000-$6,000 — not cheap. But you may be wondering if it’s worth the cost in energy and money savings over the long haul.

Dave says the payback period is shorter than you might think. He says he had full-blown foam insulation done to his home. “I took meticulous notes and almost every month was the same: You’ll save 29% in the first year,” he says. “The months following have stayed at that level, which means the foam holds its own month after month.”

That means that if you’re paying $400 a month on your energy bill, you’d be saving 30% of that — about $120 — every 30 days. If you multiply that by a year, that’s more than $1,000. After about five or six years, the system will have more than paid for itself, Dave says. And the good thing is that the foam doesn’t degrade, it keeps its quality year after year.

Final Thoughts

By investing some effort, time and yes, a little money, you can lower your home’s heating costs without sacrificing your comfort.

The initial costs associated with a smart thermostat, a water heater blanket and other items will pay off relatively quickly when you look at the amount of money you will have saved over the long haul.

What are some ways that you lower your heating bill? Let us know in the comments.

More Resources From Clark.com:

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