How much should you tip when you’re in other countries?

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Tip Advisor map
Image Credit: GoCompare.com's Tip Advisor
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Got questions about how much to tip when you’re traveling overseas? There’s a new interactive world map with tipping info for some 50 countries around the globe that can put your questions to rest.

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Is tipping customary at your vacation destination?

It’s the soundest and perhaps oldest bit of travel advice there is: When in Rome, do as the Romans do. And wherever your feet take you in your travels, so goes your wallet. Therefore it only makes sense to apply the same logic to tipping when you’re in a foreign country!

Here at Clark.com, we’ve discussed travel tipping from several different angles — everything from how much to tip at a restaurant to who to tip when you’re on the road. But all that advice was geared toward the domestic traveler.

Thanks to affordable international airfare, traveling abroad is something that more people will be doing this summer.

But no matter whether you’re going to Canada or Cambodia, Peru or Poland, Sri Lanka or Switzerland, it’s helpful to know what the local expectations are when it comes to tipping.

To that end, GoCompare.com has come up with Tip Advisor, an interactive map that details the tipping habits in 50 many countries around the world — including the United States!

Here are some interesting tidbits that may surprise you as you navigate around the map:

  • Australian cabbies don’t expect tips and restaurant tipping isn’t necessary, either.
  • Tipping isn’t expected or necessary in cabs, at dinner or for hotel staff in Belgium.
  • Taxi drivers in Cambodia don’t expect tips.
  • Leaving a tip at a restaurant in China is considered impolite.
  • Croatian cabbies don’t expect a tip. Ditto for those in the Czech Republic.
  • Taking a short taxi ride in Egypt? No tip is necessary.
  • Tipping is fairly rare in Finland, but a small gratuity is appreciated in cabs, at restaurants and for hotel staff.
  • In Japan, tipping is uncommon. In fact, tips may be politely refused.
  • Going to Malaysia? Tipping isn’t expected. Ditto for New Zealand.

Here are some more travel-related articles you might enjoy from Clark.com:

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