Opting out of Apple Music’s auto renewal subscription

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Opting out of Apple Music’s auto renewal subscription
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So Apple has made a big announcement about its new music service. With iPhones having around 40% of the market, there’s no doubt it will be an instant success.

Apple Music will be priced at $10 a month, except there’s a great offer for families. Families will pay $15 a month for up to 6 members. That’s a tremendous offer when you think about it.

How to opt out of Apple Music’s auto renewal subscription

Right now, Apple Music is offering a free 3-month trial. But at the end of that period, it’s set to automatically renew your subscription. If you don’t want that to happen, follow this advice from Brett Molina of USA TODAY:

1. Click on the icon in the upper left of the Apple Music app (it looks like a pink head). This takes you to your account settings, which includes the option to ‘View Apple ID.’ If you have trouble finding it, you can also access this at the bottom of the home pages for the App Store and iTunes on your phone.

2. Viewing your Apple ID will take you to Account Settings. Scroll down until you see a section for ‘Subscriptions’ and press Manage in blue.

3. Under Apple Music Membership, you should see a switch toggled on for Automatic Renewal. Turn that off. This enables users to enjoy the trial without worrying about Apple automatically charging your account once it ends.

Here are some alternatives to Apple Music

One thing I don’t like is that Apple specifically is not going to offer a free ad-supported version of Apple Music. That’s scary to me. Most people love having Pandora or Spotify with their ad-supported models. Spotify does great job getting you to pay subscription fees, but they have the free service if you want. I love having choice like that.

For iPhone users, the reality is you do not have to go to Apple Music. If you’re happy with Pandora or Spotify or any similar service, keep using it. Don’t get sucked into blowing $120 a year. That may not be a lot of money to you, but it is to me. That’s just how I’ve always been!

So much of business today is about getting you to pay monthly subscriptions. It seems so small $5 here, or $7 there, or $10 somewhere else. But over the course of time that’s real money.

If you always feel like your wallet is getting squeezed, take a look at your monthlies and see where you can dial back.

Meanwhile, if you’re an Amazon Prime customer and already paying $99 annually, they have a robust music service for you. Prime customers tend to know about the streaming service for TV, but they draw a blank on the free music side of the equation. So don’t pay extra elsewhere; it’s already baked into the cake of Amazon Prime!

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Clark Howard About the author:
Clark Howard is a consumer expert whose goal is to help you keep more of the money you make. His national radio show and website show you ways to put more money in your pocket, with advice you can trust. More about Clark
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