Clark Howard: Why Amazon doesn’t care it crashed on Prime Day 2018

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Clark Howard: Why Amazon doesn’t care it crashed on Prime Day 2018
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People who went to Amazon.com to search for Prime Day deals Monday were greeted with various pictures of dogs and a message that read, “UH-OH. Something went wrong on our end. Please try again.”

The retailer’s website crashed as Prime Day started at 3 p.m. ET and problems continued through the afternoon and evening.

RELATED: Best Prime Day deals: Live updates for 2018 Prime Day

About two hours into the shopping event, Amazon posted a statement on its Facebook and Twitter accounts that infuriated Prime members who were unable to shop.

“Some customers are having difficulty shopping, and we’re working to resolve this issue quickly. Many are shopping successfully – in the first hour of Prime Day in the U.S., customers have ordered more items compared to the first hour last year. There are hundreds of thousands of deals to come and more than 34 hours to shop Prime Day.”

Customers who replied to Amazon’s statement said they didn’t care to hear about the number of items purchased compared to last year — they wanted to know when they would be able to complete their purchases.

Amazon didn’t issue an update later Monday, but some customers continued to get error messages for hours and hours.

Many folks who’ve left comments on Clark’s Facebook page said Amazon needs to make it up to customers. One commenter said that Amazon’s free 30-day trial has backfired.

Virginia Greenway Mullis: It sucks. I have been a Prime member for over 10 years with over 300 orders over the past 4 years and I can’t even get on the site to buy a dang toaster. It is not even a Prime Deal, just need a new toaster. Frankly, Amazon shouldn’t have allowed folks to sign up for a free 30 days of Prime, just to get the deals and then be able to cancel their membership before they get charged the Prime member fee. Meanwhile, loyal, longtime customers get elbowed out of deals, or the entire website for that matter. Amazon royally screwed up this year. Prime Day 2017 was a breeze compared to this year’s disaster. The only thing I have managed this year is gifting a KU subscription but I think I saw every freaking Amazon Dog before I finally got through checkout.

At this point, it’s not clear if Amazon will do anything to make things right with customers after the technical meltdown.

In the past, we’ve explained how Prime members can get their benefits extended when a delivery is late with a call to customer service. Another Facebook user said that tactic worked for her during the site crash:

Rhonda Hollfelder: Still not working for me, but just chatted with Miren and had my prime membership extended by two months. I love dogs but seeing them today over and over again made me want to throw my phone.

Money expert Clark Howard was live on Facebook at the start of Prime Day and wasn’t able to view any of the deals himself. However, he said he doesn’t think the crash will hurt Amazon in the grand scheme of things.

“Amazon set up their Prime Day as if it was the worst five o’clock in the afternoon rush hour anywhere in the world. It’s all about creating a frenzy. You trying to get on to buy and clicking again and again — refreshing your phone and computer and not being able to get into it — is part of the psychology of making Amazon feel like a place you must use, must need and must have. Amazon isn’t unhappy that people had so many problems, Amazon is thrilled because it feeds right into the whole psychology that you just gotta, gotta, gotta have it.”

If Amazon.com is working for you and you want to take advantage of the Prime Day deals, go to ClarkDeals.com to learn about the best things to buy before the sale ends!

RELATED: Amazon Prime Day 2018: Top 5 ways to get the best deals!

More Clark.com stories about Amazon:

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Michael Timmermann paid off his mortgage in two years. Now, he shares his money-saving tips on his blog, MichaelSaves.com.
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