Target’s expanded curbside and same-day delivery service: 3 things to know

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Target’s expanded curbside and same-day delivery service: 3 things to know
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If you’re a shopper who has grown accustomed to the amenities of same-day delivery and curbside pickup, you’ll be happy to know another retailer has joined the party in a big way. Target announced this week that it is expanding its Drive Up curbside pickup and Shipt same-day delivery services across the Midwest and Southeast.
Starting this week, Chicago is the first city to have all four of Target’s new delivery and pickup options: Shipt, Drive Up, Target Restock and from-store delivery.

Target expands same-day delivery & curbside services

Here are three things to know about Target’s new plans:
1. In addition to expanding in six Midwest states — Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri and Wisconsin — Target said it will keep its promise to make Shipt available from most of its stores in more than 40 states by the December holidays.
2. Southern cities like Nashville, Raleigh and Columbia are next up as Target’s Shipt service is set to quickly expand to more than 135 markets by the end of June.
3. Target’s curbside delivery service, Drive Up, will be in around 1,000 stores by the holidays, the store says. This week, the service debuted in Midwestern markets like Des Moines, Iowa; Kansas City, Missouri; Madison, Wisconsin; and Omaha, Nebraska. Drive Up also launched in the Southeast markets of Raleigh, North Carolina; Nashville, Tennessee; and Columbia, South Carolina.

Target announced late last year that it was buying delivery service Shipt for $550 million.
Customers now have several options when it comes to same-day delivery and curbside of their items. Here are some of the big ones:

Amazon Fresh

Even before its blockbuster purchase of Whole Foods in 2017 Amazon was experimenting with delivering fresh diary and meats to Prime members. With the broad appeal of Whole Food’s organic brand, Amazon has quickly seized on the opportunity to make the brick-and-mortar store part of its digital platform. Enter Amazon Fresh, the company’s delivery and pick-up service.
Every 30 days, Amazon Prime costs $10.99 and the Fresh add-on is billed at a cost of $14.99, totaling $25.98 a month, according to Amazon. Annual Prime subscribers pay $99 a year plus $14.99 a month for Fresh.

Kroger’s Clicklist

In November of 2014, Kroger introduced Clicklist, an online grocery ordering service, to its customers. Since then, patrons, who seem to love the service, get to shop online and pick up their orders at the store (Kroger workers will even load orders in your vehicle for you).
New ClickList users can use the service for free the first three times before a $4.95 fee kicks in. Many locations have dedicated Clicklist parking spaces. In addition to digital coupons, customers can also get a free item under the “Free Friday download” button on the app.

Walmart Grocery

Walmart’s online grocery service allows certified personal shoppers to pick out everything you need at the store and bring it to your home or outside the stores for curbside pickup. While the service is available in about 40 cities now, Walmart has vowed to expand online grocery ordering and delivery to 100 metropolitan areas by the end of 2018.
Customers can get their goods in under four hours if their orders are received before 1 p.m. Patrons must pay a flat $9.95 fee plus purchase at least $30 worth of goods for the service.

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Craig Johnson is a conscious money-saver who stills read paperback books and listens to vinyl. He likes to write about how technology is making things easier and more affordable — but also sometimes more dangerous — for the modern consumer.
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