Forget Casual Friday, this company has no dress code at all

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Forget Casual Friday, this company has no dress code at all
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If you don’t like having to follow the rules of a professional-style dress code, you might be interested in what PricewaterhouseCoopers is doing.

The professional services giant has ditched its dress code in Australia, according to the Financial Review, and workers really seem to be embracing the symbolic move.

Read more: How to earn $20,000 doing small jobs from home

PwC ditches dress code in Australia

The company’s previous standard was “modern professional dress,” which included the following recommendations:

Men:

  • Traditional business
  • Suit and accessories
  • Tailored dress trousers
  • Smart shirts with collar
  • Fine knitwear
  • Jacket (optional)
  • Business socks
  • Dress shoes or boots

Women:

  • Traditional business suit with smart shoes and accessories
  • Tailored dress trousers
  • Tailored dresses, skirts
  • Smart shirts, blouses
  • Fine knitwear
  • Jacket (optional)
  • Business-style shoes or boots

The change in Australia comes after a female worker at PwC in London was sent home for not wearing high heels. The Daily Mail reports the dress code change was not a response to that incident.

Instead, PricewaterhouseCoopers says it ripped up the dress code to “unlock the creativity and diversity of our people.”

But don’t expect workers to start wearing hot pants and tube tops. While there is no official dress code anymore, a company official says employees are expected to use to their judgment and common sense.

Read more: This country just banned weekend work emails

Do you think workplace dress codes are necessary? Take our Twitter poll:

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Michael Timmermann paid off his mortgage in two years. Now, he shares his money-saving tips on his blog, MichaelSaves.com.
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