The best jobs for entry-level workers

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The best jobs for entry-level workers
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With back-to-school season now in full swing, the last thing on students’ minds is finding a job. But with more college graduates being saddled with student loan debt, landing a job isn’t just a goal but an imperative. Student loan borrowers in the class of 2016 have an average debt of $37,172, which, as we reported earlier this year, is a record high.

On top of that, entry-level workers who may not have attended college may be on the lookout for a new gig now that the job market’s looking up.

Read more: 10 job interview mistakes you’ll most likely regret

Best jobs for entry-level workers

SmartRecruiters, a recruitment-technology company, has released data showing the top available entry-level positions. Using data from 700 hiring companies, 1 million job listings and more than 100,000 hires, the company dug around to see which entry-level positions are opening up in greater numbers and in which industries. Turns out, sales tops the list of most available entry-level positions, snaring 14% of all available jobs:

  1. Sales (14%)
  2. Customer Service (12%)
  3. Administrative (6%)
  4. Business Development (6%)
  5. Marketing (5%)

SmartRecruiters also examined the top industries hiring entry-level workers. To no one’s surprise, the tech industry is doing the most hiring. (However, positions in Food & Beverage, for example, may be less-suitable for college grads.)

  1. Technology (21%)
  2. Healthcare (11%)
  3. Communications (9%)
  4. Retail (7%)
  5. Food & Beverage (7%)

Read more: 10 high-paying jobs that don’t require a college degree

Life after graduation 

There’s no telling where students will wind up after graduation, be it from high school, community college or a four-year school, but one thing’s for sure: They don’t want to begin their adulthood burdened by debt of any kind. It’s important to learn good financial habits early, lest they come back to bite later, and research ways to cut back on expenses. For some college students, this may mean making meals at home, enrolling in the right meal plan offered through school, buying used textbooks or choosing a low-interest credit card. (You can see our expert guide to the best student credit cards here.)

And whether you’ve already taken out loans or are considering applying for them if you’re in college, be sure you know where your credit stands, as your credit scores can determine what types of rates and benefits you may qualify for. You can view a free snapshot of your credit report, updated monthly, on Credit.com.

Read more: The one specific thing employers look for on a resume

More from Credit.com:

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

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