UPDATE: 27 more people sickened by Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal, retailers still selling it

|
Kellogg's Honey Smacks
Image Credit: Kellogg Company
Team Clark is adamant that we will never write content influenced by or paid for by an advertiser. To support our work, we do make money from some links to companies and deals on our site. Learn more about our guarantee here.
Advertisement

A month after a voluntary recall was first issued, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says another 27 people have fallen ill in 19 states after eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal tied to a salmonella outbreak.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration says the contaminated cereal can still be found for sale at some retailers.

RELATED: Recall alert: Salmonella outbreak linked to pre-cut melon sold at grocery stores

100 cases now tied to Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal recall

The CDC has reiterated its call for people to stop eating the cereal and for stores to stop selling it. One hundred case have now been tied to the June 14 recall of an estimated 1.3 million cases of Honey Smacks cereal.

In fact, two more states have reported outbreaks — Florida and Colorado. That brings the state count up to 33. You can see a map that shows all states where people have been sickened by the cereal here.

As a reminder, the recall involves 15.3 oz. and 23 oz. packages of Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal with the following UPC codes:

kellogg recall cereal UPC

If you already have any of these products at home, do not eat them. Throw the cereal away and visit Kelloggs.com/HoneySmacksRecall for info on getting a full refund.

According to CNBC, the recall was initially prompted by 60 reports Kellogg Company received from the FDA and CDC about illnesses related to the cereal.

The third-party manufacturing facility that made the cereal has stopped production.

Salmonella is a bacteria that can cause symptoms such as fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, and may even be fatal in young children, frail or elderly people. In rare cases, Salmonella can cause more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis if it gets into the bloodstream.

More recall stories on Clark.com:

Advertisement
Theo Thimou About the author:
Theo has co-written several books with Clark Howard, including the New York Times #1 bestseller Living Large in Lean Times. As a single widowed parent of two young children, he strives to bring unique savings tips to men and women like him who must face life without their spouses. He can be reached at [email protected]
View More Articles
  • Show Comments Hide Comments