Most and least expensive cities to buy a used car

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Most and least expensive cities to buy a used car
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If you’re looking for a deal on a used car, location makes a difference!

Of course, it’s fair to assume that a car sold in an expensive area like New York City will cost more than one sold in Buffalo. But how much more? It could be thousands of dollars!

What does your city consider a fair used car price? 

Read more: How to buy a used car​

Instamotor.com came up with the most and least expensive cities to buy a used car after analyzing over 300,000 Craigslist postings across 75 top metro areas.  

The most expensive area to buy a private party used car was San Francisco, with a $9,488 average used car price. The least expensive was Cleveland at $5,265. That’s a $4,223 difference! 

Instamotor only looked at vehicles listed by owners, not dealership sales.

Here’s a look at the most and least expensive cities to buy a private party used car: 

Most and least expensive cities to buy a used car

Read more: 5 warning signs your mechanic should not be trusted

Most and least expensive cities to buy a used car

Clark’s take on used car buying

Clark likes the idea of buying a car that’s two or three years old, rather than a new car. Because when you buy a new car, it loses value the minute you drive it off the lot. Let somebody else eat that depreciation and buy used!

Since most used cars are sold “as-is,” it’s important for you to have the vehicle inspected by an independent mechanic before you buy it. CarFax alone is not enough of a check. You don’t want to rely on any representations that the salesperson makes about the car.

Read Clark’s step-by-step guide to buying a used car.

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Michael Timmermann paid off his mortgage in two years. Now, he shares his money-saving tips on his blog, MichaelSaves.com.
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