This iPhone scam is tricking people into handing over their Apple ID and password

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This iPhone scam is tricking people into handing over their Apple ID and password
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If you or someone you know has an iPhone, there’s a new version of a classic phishing scam that Clark wants you to be aware of to avoid getting ripped off! 

This time around, scammers are pretending to be from Apple and ask you to verify personal information.

Read more: Mysterious bug is still shutting down iPhones with 30% battery left

Phishing scam! iPhone users receive suspicious messages 

According to the New York Times, potential scam victims receive an email from “Apple iMessages” — saying that their username and password had been used to gain access to another iPhone.

But if you click the link, you’ll be taken to a page that will ask for your Apple ID and password. Big mistake. 

The scammers want your Apple ID and password because they know that most people link their account to credit cards for iTunes or App Store purchases, which is why you should never share this information. 

So if you see a suspicious link in an email or text message you weren’t expecting, ignore it and contact Apple directly.

According to a statement on its official website, Apple will never ask you for your password, security questions, verification codes or recovery key.

The #1 way to safeguard your Apple account

To protect your account, Apple suggests that you set up two-factor authentication. With this security feature, you’ll be asked to verify your identity with a six-digit code the first time you enter your Apple ID and password on a new device.

By never giving anyone your password and verification code, the criminals don’t stand a chance. 

If you’ve received a phishing email purporting to be from Apple, send it to [email protected] so that it can be investigated and hopefully stop the scammers in their tracks.

Read more: How to disable iPhone feature that could cost you hundreds of dollars

Scam alert: Fake iPhone apps

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Mike Timmermann About the author: Mike Timmermann
Michael Timmermann paid off his mortgage in two years. Now, he shares his money-saving tips on his blog, Save on Almost Everything.
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