Health care sharing ministries surge in popularity, Magnify Money analysis shows

|
Health care sharing ministries surge in popularity, Magnify Money analysis shows
Image Credit: Dreamstime
Team Clark is adamant that we will never write content influenced by or paid for by an advertiser. To support our work, we do make money from some links to companies and deals on our site. Learn more about our guarantee here.
Advertisement

In 2013, Melanie and Matthew Moore were facing a bit of a health care cost crisis. After the birth of their first child, the Wake Forest, N.C., couple decided that it made sense for Melanie, 33, to leave her job and become the primary caregiver at home. Not only did that mean losing an additional income source, but it also meant giving up the family’s affordable health benefits.

The monthly premium for a family plan through Matthew’s employer far exceeded the reach of their newly reduced budget. Melanie began researching health insurance options online, and eventually landed on the home page for Samaritan Ministries. East-Peoria, Ill.-based Samaritan is one of the six major faith-based health care sharing ministries in the U.S.. Members of these ministries pay monthly contributions to a pool of funding that is dispersed among members as they show need.

Read more: Obamacare / Affordable Health Care Act Guide

Affordable faith baised health insurance

Samaritan coverage for Melanie and her son cost just $300 per month — less than half what they would have paid for a family health plan through Matthew’s job. Melanie quickly signed them up. To keep costs as low as possible, they decided Matthew, 31, would continue to receive individual coverage through his employer, which was free.

Even more than the price tag, Melanie says she appreciated the ministry’s faith-based approach to health care. “Health sharing promotes the Biblical ideals of sharing,” she told MagnifyMoney. “It takes a whole different mindset than insurance.”

The Moore family is not alone. As health care expenses have ballooned over the last decade, health care sharing ministries have gained in popularity as a lower cost alternative to traditional insurance. Their numbers still pale in comparison to people who receive insurance through employers or the federal marketplace. But health care sharing ministries have experienced an explosion in interest in recent years.

Membership among the top four health care sharing ministries nearly tripled in just the last two years — from a reported 274,000 members in 2014 to more than 803,000 Americans in 2016, according to a MagnifyMoney analysis of membership rates at the top six ministries. Even the smallest ministry in the bunch, Altrua, saw an eight-fold surge in membership in the last year alone — from 1,000 in early 2016 to 8,000 as of November 2016.

But what exactly are health care sharing ministries, and can they really replace primary health insurance?

At a glance, health care sharing seems like a perfect solution to families facing rising premium costs. However, a deeper look shows that participants take a leap of faith when they eschew traditional insurance protections in favor of health care sharing ministries. MagnifyMoney took a deeper look at how they work.

Read more: Faith-based health care: A viable alternative to traditional health insurance?

hm

How health care sharing ministries work

Ministry members pay a monthly share to the health care sharing ministry. Monthly share costs can be as low as $21 for an individual, but they can be as much as $780 per month for a family. Share costs vary from ministry to ministry and can also change unexpectedly, much like traditional insurance premiums.

In terms of actual functions, most health care sharing ministries collect monthly shares online, and they disburse funds electronically or through checks. Not all the share money goes directly to helping people in need. Some of the money goes to cover administrative costs, and some money goes to an escrow account. The escrow accounts allow ministry participants to share costs even during periods of high expenses.

Submitting claims

When members incur medical expenses, they submit their bills to the ministry board for approval. Some health care sharing ministries allow medical providers to send bills directly to the ministry. The board then approves or denies sharing. When cost sharing is approved, the member is paid in one of two primary ways: Either the ministry disburses funds to those in need directly, or the ministry directs other members to send their monthly premium payments to the member in need instead.

Health care sharing ministries encourage members to pray for sick members and to send encouraging letters or emails to those in need. Health care sharing ministries specifically publish medical needs to members of the community for the purpose of prayer and encouragement.

“You almost can’t compare sharing to health insurance,” says Dale Bellis, executive director of Liberty HealthShare. “Sharing is about giving not receiving. Your goal is to be available for others in need. Participating is motivated by faith in God and faith in one another.”

The “individual responsibility”

Before covering a cost, some health care sharing ministries require that members meet an “individual responsibility requirement.” Basically, this is their form of a deductible. The individual responsibility can cost from $35 per incident all the way to $5,000 per incident. For example, Samaritan Ministriesrequires members to cover up to $300 per incident. Medi-Share requires members to pay a non-reimbursable fee of $35 per medical visit or $135 for an emergency room visit (much like a co-pay).

Read more: Important health tests and screenings you can’t afford to skip

Negotiating bills

One of the benefits of participating in a health care sharing ministry is that many ministries emphasize the importance of negotiating medical expenses. It’s in the ministry’s interest to encourage members to negotiate fees, which leaves all the more money in the pool for everyone else. Some ministries hire third-party firms to negotiate bills, but it’s up to members to take advantage of those services.

Altrua Healthshare directly negotiates on behalf of its members, according toRon Bruno, VP of Business Development.

To incentivize members to negotiate their bills, some ministries offer to waive the member’s individual responsibility portion.

For example, Melanie negotiated a discount at the birth center when she had her second child in 2016. The discount she received more than covered her individual sharing responsibility of $300. That meant 100% of her expenses were covered by Samaritan.

Who can benefit the most from health care sharing ministries

At their heart, health care sharing ministries are meant to help members who are facing unusually high or unexpected health care costs. To that end, most ministries do not cover the kinds of routine preventative care — like annual physicals and immunizations — that private insurers are required to cover. Commonly “shared” expenses among ministry members are things like sudden illness or surgeries, says Michael Gardner, a spokesperson for Medi-Share.

In a way, health care sharing ministries have replaced catastrophic health plans that were phased out under the Affordable Care Act. People who may not require regular doctor’s visits but who want a health plan for emergency health care needs might benefit from a health care sharing ministry.

Read more: Paying cash for non-emergency medical needs can save you big

Finding a doctor

For the most part, ministry members are free to choose primary care doctors of their choice. This is because health care sharing ministries don’t usually share the cost of preventive care. The exception, Altrua HealthShare, has a network of affiliate providers including primary care physicians.

The trouble with choosing “any” doctor is finding a primary care physician who will accept patients who pay in cash. Samaritan Ministries directs their members to use a “cash and direct pay” resource from the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons.

Outside of primary care physicians, each health care sharing ministry allows members to request sharing pre-approval for planned surgeries and other expensive procedures. Most ministries have established processes or arrangements that help their members find the most cost-effective surgeons and specialists in their area.

For example, Liberty HealthShare maintains a list of providers who negotiated bills and accepted payments from Liberty in the recent past. Medi-Share has members search databases for preferred medical providers.

Even with these resources, members are free to find their own doctors, and they will still be eligible for sharing (as long as they follow the standard procedures set forth by the ministry).

When it comes to emergency care, ministry members use the best available option and submit their bills for sharing afterward. The health care sharing ministries will seek to honor requests to share even expensive emergency care (provided the emergency care meets their standards).

Read more: 5 unique ways to save money on health care that will surprise you

Health care sharing ministries vs. insurance companies

It’s crucial to understand that health care sharing ministries are not insurance companies. They operate more like nonprofit organizations. And because they are not technically insurance companies, they have no contractual obligation to cover certain medical expenses. That means they can mostly write their own rulebook for what they will cover and what they won’t.

Each health care sharing ministry has full discretion over which treatments it will cover, and ministries will not cover many treatments or conditions that do not align with their religious ideals. For example, many ministries won’t cover treatment for drug or alcohol addictions. Medi-Share, for example, will typically not cover prenatal care for an unmarried woman or health care for children born to unwed mothers. These are costs that traditional insurers would cover without hesitation.

There are also limits to how much health care sharing ministries are willing to cover. The majority of ministries have a maximum sharing amount of $125,000-$1 million per incident. In contrast, government-approved health insurance plans do not have annual or lifetime maximums for insurance coverage. That’s not to say that these ministries can’t absorb large costs. Samaritan Ministries participants share $18 million per month in medical costs. Currently, Liberty HealthShare has a sharing capacity of $6 million per month among 30,000 households. Medi-Share and Christian Healthcare Ministrieshave shared more than $1 billion each.

Health care sharing ministries do not cover preventive care, which is largely required of most traditional insurers. Members pay out of pocket for annual physicals, birth control, routine immunizations, and even preventive cancer screenings. In contrast, preventive care benefits are covered without cost sharing in approved health insurance plans.

Read more: 4 insurance startups that will change the way you shop for insurance

When health care sharing ministries don’t make financial sense

Because these ministries don’t cover routine health costs, health care sharing ministries make sense for people with low routine health care costs. In general, this includes many healthy people who don’t struggle with chronic conditions.

One surprising group that needs to look out for high routine costs are new parents.

In early 2016, Matthew and Melanie Moore gave birth to their second child. After the birth, the Moores chose to enroll the children on Matthew’s insurance plan instead of keeping them on the Samaritan plan, which wouldn’t cover any of their newborn well visits.

Infants visit the doctor 9-10 times in their first 18 months, and they receive dozens of immunizations during that time. For the Moores, the out-of-pocket costs for preventive care would have overwhelmed their budget again.

Faith (almost always) required

Health care sharing ministries have been around since the 1980s, led by Christian Healthcare Ministries. Like Melanie and her family, most health care sharing ministry participants are drawn to the organizations’ emphasis on faith.

The organizations model their sharing plan after resource sharing ideals practiced by the early Christian church nearly 2,000 years ago.

All the health care sharing ministries require that their members affirm some set of beliefs. Most specifically, they require participants to adhere to the Christian faith. Liberty HealthShare is an exception, according to Bellis. “We are unabashedly a Christian organization, but we don’t intrude on the faith choices of participants,” he says.

Bruno, of Altrua Healthshare, explained that members of Altrua adhere to a statement of standards instead of a statement of beliefs. The standards are based on the Bible, but the ministry is non-denominational.

One reason Melanie Moore loves health care sharing ministries is the sense of community and encouragement she receives from other members. She received notes of congratulations and prayers for recovery when she received checks to pay for her child’s delivery. Likewise, she sends notes of encouragement along with her monthly share check.

All the health care sharing ministries encourage participants to pray and give words of encouragement to sick participants. The ministries exist to foster community and to promote sharing. Anyone looking for an impersonal experience will need to look elsewhere.

Each of the ministries is faithful to its heritage. These ministries are faith-centered, and they want to promote religious faith among their members. It is clear that these ministries want members to share more than medical bills. They want to promote a community of care among their members.

Read more: Essential health care resources to know about if you’re broke

Health care sharing ministries in the Obamacare era

Under the guidelines of the Affordable Care Act, health care sharing ministries would never pass muster. But five of the six large health care sharing ministries were granted exemptions under the ACA — meaning their members will not have to pay tax penalties for not having qualified health coverage.

Please note: Members of Medical Cost Sharing (MCS), another ministry, will not receive qualified exemptions from Affordable Care Act penalties. Their website uses language that may lead you to believe otherwise.

Read more: How the Obamacare Penalties Work and How To Avoid Them

The bottom line

Walking the line between faith and finances hasn’t been easy for the Moore family. Melanie is still a member of Samaritan, but the rest of the family is on Matthew’s traditional insurance plan.

Like the Moores, anyone considering a health care sharing ministry should think about their mindset, their faith, and their finances. Don’t join a ministry because of the low monthly costs; the organizations want members who live out the belief statements. Be sure that the rewards of joining a ministry (both financial and otherwise) outweigh the associated risks.

Read more: Virtual doctor visits could drastically reduce your health care costs

Faith-based organizations paying for your health care

Advertisement
Author placeholder image About the author:
  • Show Comments Hide Comments