Study finds kitchen sponges are filthier than toilets

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Kitchen sponge
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A recent study discovered that our homes’ kitchens have more germs than toilets, and there’s one main culprit: sponges.

Kitchen sponges are a breeding ground for bacteria

That’s right: Kitchen sponges are the biggest source of active bacteria in the entire house.

Not only is there a plethora of bacteria in a kitchen sponge, but it’s incredibly easy to spread germs because most sponges are used to clean multiple surfaces. This leads to potentially harmful bacteria getting into your food. Gross!

Read more: 43 home cleaning hacks you’ll wish you knew sooner

Cleaning sponges isn’t 100% effective

You can try to minimize the damage by throwing a used sponge into the microwave or dishwasher. However, these techniques only reduce bacteria by 60%, at best!

Experts at The Good Housekeeping Institute also tested ways to sanitize sponges, and discovered that mixing 3/4 cup of bleach in one gallon of water and soaking the sponge for five minutes was the most effective way to clean a sponge.

Regardless of which method you use, the study revealed that regularly sanitized sponges contain just as much bacteria as unclean ones.

Read more: 9 things you forget to clean in your kitchen

How often should you replace a sponge?

Experts now recommend replacing sponges frequently, about once a week.

Check out your local dollar store to find cheap sponges, so you can keep your home clean without busting your budget.

Tip: Cut your sponge in half to double the savings. Half a sponge cleans just as well as an entire sponge!

Read more: How to squeeze every single last drop from household products

Cheap tips for a cleaner house

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Sally McDonald About the author:
Sally is the newsletter editor for Clark Howard brands. She enjoys great travel deals, minimal living and saving big bucks. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia, with her husband.
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